Posted by: Jim Bell | April 4, 2011

Clavehouse’s Dragoons

The following was written by the editor of The Lowland Scots Regiments : their origin, character and services previous to the great war of 1914, Sir Herbert Maxwell.

In my youth I heard a story which was current in the Stewartry of Kirkcudbright; whether truth or fiction, it illustrates the vitality of the Covenanters’ tradition in that district. It was told of a hill shepherd who, according to custom, was reading the Scripture aloud to his wife before going to bed. The chapter chosen happened to be Revelation xii. When he came to the third verse:

“And there appeared another wonder in heaven; and behold a great reid dragoon.”

“Ye maun be wrang there, lad,” interrupted the wife; “there never was a dragoon in heaven; it wad be nae place for him.”

“It maun be sae, wife,” replied her husband, “it maun be sae; for it’s in the written Word, ye ken.”

“Atweel,” rejoined the other, “if it’s in the Word it maun be sae; but here’s ae thing I ken it wisna yen o’ Claverse’s dragoons.”

The gudeman resumed his reading, and went on till he came to the ninth verse:

“And the great dragoon was cast oot.”

“I tell’t ye that, lad,” broke in the wife shrilly, “I tell’t ye that! He widna bide in Heaven lang; it was nae place for him!”

The Lowland Scots Regiments : their origin, character and services previous to the great war of 1914,  by Sir Herbert Maxwell.

 

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